Buying Laminate Flooring Online And Its Benefits

Buying Laminate Flooring Online And Its Benefits

How to Save Money on Laminate Flooring When You Buy Online Save Up TO 30% OFF You’ve decided it’s time to update a room or hallway in your home, and laminate wood flooring is an intriguing option. People often instinctively stick with the familiar — old hardwoods are replaced with fragile, new ones, or dingy carpet is replaced with soon-to-be dingy carpet — but you’re ready for an easy, low-cost, long-lasting upgrade. You can now save up to 30% on that upgrade with Designer Floor Planks by purchasing them online directly from the Swiss Krono USA’s Laminate Flooring Factory Outlet. You’ll get FREE samples, FREE delivery, and FREE returns — plus, installation is a snap. Our laminate wood flooring combines the beauty of hardwoods with a level of durability unmatched by most other flooring materials. The combination of elegant look and lasting finish makes laminate floors perfect for high-traffic areas like kitchens and hallways as well as high-style areas like dining and living rooms. Discover the Benefits of Laminate Wood Flooring Swiss Krono USA laminate flooring products are made from real wood in Barnwell, South Carolina, by some of the world’s best craftsmen. Several options offer a lifetime warranty, while the others come with 35-year warranties. All of our laminate floors resist damage from scratches, stains and sunlight. Our Designer Floor Planks feature a tongue-and-groove finish, so you can install them quickly with no sanding or curing time required. They’re light and easy to handle while installing … and no splinters! Not sure which Designer Floor Plank finish, color and style is best for your room upgrade? Order a... Read More
What Is Laminate Flooring and How Is It Made?

What Is Laminate Flooring and How Is It Made?

It’s an amazing manufacturing process by which four layers are fused together in a single press operation at high heat at over 300˚F using direct-pressure laminate (DPL) construction. DPL is the most typical fusing method used to manufacture residential laminate flooring. Let’s review each of the four layers starting with the bottom layer [labeled “D”]. Layer D: Backer paper At the base of every Swiss Krono laminate flooring plank is a bottom balancing layer that keeps the board straight. The backer seals the back of the laminate board so its dimensional stability isn’t compromised in any way, for example by moisture. Some Swiss Krono laminate planks have foam padding added, eliminating the need for an underlayment; underlayment or padding enhances the acoustical quality of the floors when you walk on it. Layer C: HDF core or board The core layer of Swiss Krono laminate flooring is high-density fiberboard (HDF). There is also medium-density fiberboard (MDF), which Swiss Krono does not use in the production of its laminate flooring planks. Both HDF and MDF are made from softwood fibers that are broken down, combined with a wax and resin binder, and formed into panels using heat and pressure. However, HDF offers superior stability and strength compared with MDF for the production of laminate flooring; it makes a better floor. During the manufacturing process, the HDF core will be milled to absolute, micron-precise tolerances. The edges of each plank will be cut to specific profiles to make them easily and consistently fit together for a snug, reliable installation according to one of four locking systems. The extreme micron-milling precision required for these locking systems... Read More
Wood Laminate or Luxury Vinyl Tile: Which Is Right for You?

Wood Laminate or Luxury Vinyl Tile: Which Is Right for You?

Have you wondered how laminate flooring and luxury vinyl tile (LVT) compare as flooring solutions and which is right for your home? After all, in the world of hard-surface flooring (as opposed to the soft carpeted kind), laminate flooring such as Swiss Krono USA Designer Floor Planks and LVT are highly popular with homeowners. LVT is part of what is known as “resilient flooring” that also includes sheet-vinyl and rubber flooring. Let’s compare LVT and laminate flooring so you can decide which material is right for you. How laminate flooring and LVT are similar: Both have cost and durability advantages over such other solid-surface flooring choices as hardwood, ceramic or stone. Both laminate flooring and LVT have become master imitators of natural surfaces like wood, stone and other flooring types. Both are easier to maintain than wood or tile. Hardwood or engineered-wood floors may need refinishing, and some tile types may need resealing or regrouting. Both can be installed either professionally or by a reasonably skilled do-it-yourselfer who has the right tools and instructions. Both can allow for repair by replacement of a damaged plank or tile. Both have wear layers. Swiss Krono USA’s laminate flooring has an extremely hard aluminum-oxide wear layer that resists scratches and UV protection to prevent fading from prolonged exposure to sunlight. LVT may have a clear-vinyl and urethane coating to protect it. How Laminate Flooring and LVT are different: They’re made from different materials. Laminate flooring is made of layers. The primary layer (the core) is made of high-density fiberboard that gives laminate flooring its rigidity and strength. LVT is made in layers... Read More
How to Decide Between Hardwood and Laminate Flooring

How to Decide Between Hardwood and Laminate Flooring

There comes a time in the flooring decision-making process when you realize that it comes down to hardwood vs. laminate. You’ve come to your senses regarding that shag carpet. You’ve done tile before and, like most everyone else, wished you’d picked a different color, size, kind, grout, etc. We’ve all been there. And now you’re here, where most people eventually arrive, at the hardwood vs. laminate debate. In the past, it used to be no contest: Got lots of money? Spring for the hardwoods. Not so much money? Get the wood laminate. Now, though, the debate is bit more complicated — mostly because laminate flooring options have become extremely attractive in a lot of ways. First of all, consider how much of your home’s flooring you’re replacing. Are you tying the floor into another space that already has laminate vs. hardwood? If you’re tying into an existing floor, you might stick with the same flooring in order for it to match. Matching an existing hardwood floor, however, is much easier said than done. But if other floors in your home aren’t an issue, here are the basic arguments when considering hardwood vs. laminate flooring. Durability. People often make a big fuss about how long hardwoods last. The funny part is that they have to be refinished every 5 to 10 years or so depending on the amount of traffic or, in some cases, the destructive tendencies of young children. A high quality laminate is resistant to wear, fading and staining. So it will look as good as it did the day you installed it after 20 years or more... Read More
Our Laminate Flooring Is Healthier for Your Home and the Planet

Our Laminate Flooring Is Healthier for Your Home and the Planet

If protecting the environment — globally as well as inside your home — is important to you, then you should know how laminate flooring sustainability could enhance both. Swiss Krono USA uses fresh pine harvested through ecologically sound forest thinning operations, which creates less impact on the environment and means that you get the look of exotic hardwoods without harming any real exotic or endangered wood species. The manufacturing process is so efficient and results in such little waste that we end up using almost every part of the tree in the construction of our planks. Laminate flooring sustainability advantages don’t end at the manufacturing plant. It carries right over into your home, beginning with the installation of your new floor. Our tongue-and-groove locking system installs easily without the need for glue or nails. This simple installation process means fewer power tools are needed, which results in less energy use. After installation is complete, scraps can be disposed of with the rest of your household garbage. Ours is also a much healthier floor to live with for years to come. Our Designer Floor Planks require little maintenance. Regular dusting and occasional damp mopping with a 3:1 water and vinegar solution will keep your floor looking like new with no need for harsh cleansers. Unlike hardwoods, our laminate floors will never need to be refinished — a process which introduces toxic levels of dust and noxious chemicals to your home. Laminate flooring focused on indoor air quality You’re not the only one concerned about indoor air quality. We are, too. In fact, we use absolutely no harmful substances — halogen,... Read More
Healthy Homes Start at the Floor

Healthy Homes Start at the Floor

For years now, we’ve been taking the recycling bin to the curb, buying organic food, and making a conscious effort to be less wasteful. But while many brands and consumers have been focused on doing what’s good for the planet, many of us have neglected to do what’s good for our own environments — the spaces inside our homes that we inhabit each and every day, for decades on end. Since its beginning, Swiss Krono USA has gone above and beyond to do what’s better for the planet. The fresh wood fibers used in the core of our planks is harvested through ecologically sound forest thinning operations. This minimizes our impact on the environment and gives you the look of exotic hardwoods without harming any real exotic or endangered wood species. Efficiencies in our manufacturing process enable us to use almost every part of the tree, as well, creating less waste for the landfills. But unlike many other brands of laminate flooring, Swiss Krono also does what’s better for the indoors, helping the people who live on our floors to lead healthier lives. We avoid using any harmful substances, like halogen, chloride, PVC, PCB, or dioxin in the construction of our product. Plus, the decorative paper layer that gives our planks the look of real wood is printed using water-based, low volatile organic compound (VOC) inks. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, VOCs contribute to increased levels of indoor air pollution, which can cause everything from eye, nose, and throat irritation to central nervous system damage and even cancer. Laminate flooring that’s right for the Earth and our... Read More
The World’s Best Workers Make the Best Floors

The World’s Best Workers Make the Best Floors

Our modern, state-of-the-art plant in Barnwell, S.C., is an ideal location for accessing wood from sustainable-forest suppliers and for shipping our flooring efficiently. All Swiss Krono USA management, marketing, design, sales and customer service staff are based here. This is important for a two reasons: First, we’re employing American workers to perform well-paying, highly skilled jobs. American workers craft some of the best products in the world. And because we make floors for families to live on — some floors with as much as a lifetime warranty— we believe we need the best workers in the world to make the best floors in the world, like Swiss Krono’s new lines of Designer Floor Planks laminate flooring. Cheap laminate floors produced in third-world countries simply don’t meet the quality standards Americans have come to expect … and might not meet our safety standards. Second, we think it’s important to support the American economy. After all, a healthy economy means more consumer-spending power. When consumers have jobs and can keep their families housed and fed, they have extra money to spend on redecorating their homes and buying laminate flooring. We urge all consumers to verify where the products they are buying were made, then to buy American. It means quality and safety, and for some it means a job!... Read More
The ‘Can I Install Laminate Flooring Over This?’ Guide

The ‘Can I Install Laminate Flooring Over This?’ Guide

We’re listing alphabetically all of the flooring types available so that you can easily determine whether you can install laminate over that specific flooring type. Remember that laminate flooring, like Swiss Krono USA’s Designer Floor Planks, is a floating floor — it will expand and contract as temperature and other conditions change. This means that the choice of subfloor (i.e., what you install laminate over) needs to provide the right support. Bamboo: Not recommended. Brick: No. Even with a brick floor in excellent condition, there is the potential for too much surface deviance that could stress the laminate-flooring locking system. And if the floor is below grade, moisture migration will be too difficult to control. Carpeting, tufted: No. Carpet, its padding, and all its staples must be completely removed — down to the subfloor — before you install laminate flooring. Carpeting, commercial or needle-bond: No. Some types and styles of commercial or “indoor/outdoor” carpeting may look harmless, but it and any adhesive used to glue it down must be removed before installing a laminate floor. Carpet tiles: No. Everything has to go. Only the subfloor may remain when you install laminate. Ceramic tiles: Yes, provided the surface of the floor is flat and level (per our laminate subfloor specifications) and the condition of the floor is good. The tiles themselves must be smooth. You must use padding. Check for cracked or loose tiles and grout — these could be signs of a poor floor condition caused by settling that could cause problems for your laminate floor. Concrete slab (above grade): Yes. An above-grade concrete floor will most likely be... Read More

Is Luxury Vinyl Tile (LVT) Better Than Laminate Wood Flooring?

Many people are putting Luxury Vinyl Tile (LVT) planks on their floor to simulate the look of real hardwood floors. Over the last several years, homeowner wanting more durability in their hard flooring surfaces turned to laminate wood floors for realism, affordability and style. Both have their strengths, and one has a secret. LVT is made of plastic with an image of wood on the surface. The primary components of vinyl floor coverings include polyvinyl chloride (or vinyl) resins, plasticizers (high molecular-weight solvents), pigments and trace stabilizers, and a carrier sheet or backing. According to www.whatisvinyl.com, polyvinyl chloride is made from ethylene, which comes from crude oil. That’s the secret LVT is keeping from you: it is plastic made from crude oil. Being plastic, LVT works well when wood is not really an option, like where there are frequent water spills or where mopping is required daily, like in a medical clinic. If you have frequent spills on your floor or need serious mopping on a regular basis, LVT is better than laminate flooring. Laminate wood floors are made from real wood timber, mostly pine, and has a protective layer over an image of a plank on the top. Being made of wood gives laminate flooring a more realistic hardwood feel, look and sound compared to LVT. Plus laminate wood flooring is made of, well, wood and not crude oil, which is the main ingredient in LVT. Laminate floors are great for those who care about the health of our planet since wood is a sustainably managed resource and crude oil is not renewable. And while laminate is not... Read More
How to Decide on Your Laminate Floor’s Thickness

How to Decide on Your Laminate Floor’s Thickness

If you’re trying to figure out how to choose laminate wood floors for your home and wondering how thickness fits in, here are answers to your questions. How is laminate flooring thickness measured? For laminate flooring, plank thickness is measured in millimeters (mm). A millimeter is roughly 0.039 inches. Flooring products like Swiss Krono USA’s Designer Floor Planks will state plank thickness on their packages or in their advertising by measuring the entire plank thickness — from the bottom surface that rests on the subfloor to the top of the plank. So if a plank has an attached pad (meaning the underlayment is actually attached to each individual plank), you may see a plank thickness of 14 mm. That means it’s a 12 mm thick plank with a 2 mm thick pad attached, equaling 14 mm. Therefore, plank thickness doesn’t refer strictly to the core of the plank but instead to the combination of all layers that make up the plank. Is laminate flooring thickness a guarantee of durability? Not necessarily. At Swiss Krono USA, we see durability provided by the aluminum-oxide wear layer that’s on top. The wear layer makes the laminate floor able to stand up to foot traffic and minor abrasions, thus improving its durability. Impact resistance, or the ability of a laminate floor to withstand the impact of a falling object, is related to plank thickness. In general, the thicker the plank the more resistant the floor becomes to fracture from a dropped object. Brands like our Designer Floor Planks floors meet and exceed a light commercial rating on “Large-Ball Impact Resistance” and “Small-Ball (Dart) Impact... Read More