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Wood Laminate or Luxury Vinyl Tile: Which Is Right for You?

Wood Laminate or Luxury Vinyl Tile: Which Is Right for You?

Is Laminate Flooring The Right Choice? Save Up TO 30% OFF Laminate Flooring Have you wondered how laminate flooring and luxury vinyl tile (LVT) compare as flooring solutions and which is right for your home? After all, in the world of hard-surface flooring (as opposed to the soft carpeted kind), laminate flooring such as Swiss Krono USA Designer Floor Planks and LVT are highly popular with homeowners. LVT is part of what is known as “resilient flooring” that also includes sheet-vinyl and rubber flooring. Let’s compare LVT and laminate flooring so you can decide which material is right for you. How laminate flooring and LVT are similar: Both have cost and durability advantages over such other solid-surface flooring choices as hardwood, ceramic or stone. Both laminate flooring and LVT have become master imitators of natural surfaces like wood, stone and other flooring types. Both are easier to maintain than wood or tile. Hardwood or engineered-wood floors may need refinishing, and some tile types may need resealing or regrouting. Both can be installed either professionally or by a reasonably skilled do-it-yourselfer who has the right tools and instructions. Both can allow for repair by replacement of a damaged plank or tile. Both have wear layers. Swiss Krono USA’s laminate flooring has an extremely hard aluminum-oxide wear layer that resists scratches and UV protection to prevent fading from prolonged exposure to sunlight. LVT may have a clear-vinyl and urethane coating to protect it. How Laminate Flooring and LVT are different: They’re made from different materials. Laminate flooring is made of layers. The primary layer (the core) is made of high-density fiberboard... Read More
How to Decide Between Hardwood and Laminate Flooring

How to Decide Between Hardwood and Laminate Flooring

There comes a time in the flooring decision-making process when you realize that it comes down to hardwood vs. laminate. You’ve come to your senses regarding that shag carpet. You’ve done tile before and, like most everyone else, wished you’d picked a different color, size, kind, grout, etc. We’ve all been there. And now you’re here, where most people eventually arrive, at the hardwood vs. laminate debate. In the past, it used to be no contest: Got lots of money? Spring for the hardwoods. Not so much money? Get the wood laminate. Now, though, the debate is bit more complicated — mostly because laminate flooring options have become extremely attractive in a lot of ways. First of all, consider how much of your home’s flooring you’re replacing. Are you tying the floor into another space that already has laminate vs. hardwood? If you’re tying into an existing floor, you might stick with the same flooring in order for it to match. Matching an existing hardwood floor, however, is much easier said than done. But if other floors in your home aren’t an issue, here are the basic arguments when considering hardwood vs. laminate flooring. Durability. People often make a big fuss about how long hardwoods last. The funny part is that they have to be refinished every 5 to 10 years or so depending on the amount of traffic or, in some cases, the destructive tendencies of young children. A high quality laminate is resistant to wear, fading and staining. So it will look as good as it did the day you installed it after 20 years or more... Read More
How to Decide on Your Laminate Floor’s Thickness

How to Decide on Your Laminate Floor’s Thickness

If you’re trying to figure out how to choose laminate wood floors for your home and wondering how thickness fits in, here are answers to your questions. How is laminate flooring thickness measured? For laminate flooring, plank thickness is measured in millimeters (mm). A millimeter is roughly 0.039 inches. Flooring products like Swiss Krono USA’s Designer Floor Planks will state plank thickness on their packages or in their advertising by measuring the entire plank thickness — from the bottom surface that rests on the subfloor to the top of the plank. So if a plank has an attached pad (meaning the underlayment is actually attached to each individual plank), you may see a plank thickness of 14 mm. That means it’s a 12 mm thick plank with a 2 mm thick pad attached, equaling 14 mm. Therefore, plank thickness doesn’t refer strictly to the core of the plank but instead to the combination of all layers that make up the plank. Is laminate flooring thickness a guarantee of durability? Not necessarily. At Swiss Krono USA, we see durability provided by the aluminum-oxide wear layer that’s on top. The wear layer makes the laminate floor able to stand up to foot traffic and minor abrasions, thus improving its durability. Impact resistance, or the ability of a laminate floor to withstand the impact of a falling object, is related to plank thickness. In general, the thicker the plank the more resistant the floor becomes to fracture from a dropped object. Brands like our Designer Floor Planks floors meet and exceed a light commercial rating on “Large-Ball Impact Resistance” and “Small-Ball (Dart) Impact... Read More
How to Measure for Laminate Flooring in 3 Steps

How to Measure for Laminate Flooring in 3 Steps

Determining how much laminate flooring you need to buy is relatively simple, but it pays to measure properly. Follow these basic steps and then take advantage of the Flooring Calculator to make sure you order the right amount. Step 1: Figure out the square footage of each room in which you want to install laminate-wood floors. To do so, use a tape measure to determine the room’s length and width. Then multiply the length by the width to get your square footage. For instance, if the room is 12 feet wide and 12 feet long, you will need enough flooring for 144 square feet (12×12=144). Step 2: Add 10% to the square footage to accommodate cuts and waste. (If you’re choosing a tile pattern, add 20%). This is important because the cuts in the flooring need to be staggered. And you’ll want pieces left over just in case you need to mend or replace a board. So that’s 144 feet plus 10%, or 14 feet, for 158 square feet. Step 3: Check with a retailer to get your order just right; we recommend going through an authorized Swiss Krono Flooring dealer. Your measurements will certainly give you a good ballpark estimate when you multiply your square-foot needs by the retailer’s price per square foot, though little things can make a difference in the actual calculation. For instance, for installation in rooms larger than 40 feet long or 25 feet wide, a transition piece will be required. A professional will help make sure you have all the accessories you’ll need, from transition strips to underlayment to floor molding.Want to learn... Read More

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