Laminate flooring looks great on a wall

Laminate flooring looks great on a wall

One of the most popular decorating ideas of the last year has been using flooring planks to decorate a wall. You’ve probably seen these ideas on Pinterest or many home decorating TV shows. And whether it is a rustic, distressed barn wood look or a more formal dark wood like mahogany, laminate flooring is an affordable, easy way to go. You can add creativity and style to any room by placing laminate flooring on an accent wall. In fact, some decorators are even designing walls that mix more than one laminate floor design into a single wall. For example, this photo shows a single wall that is actually made from more than one of our laminate flooring collections. If you want to spice up a room yourself with laminate mounted on your wall, read below about how to install laminate on your wall. Or you can click here to open and print our installation instructions. Wall Mounting Installation Instructions Limited Warranty for laminate planks on walls: When using this product on walls, we warrant to the original purchaser that the planks will not stain, wear or fade when you follow our installation, cleaning and care instructions. IMPORTANT: You must first acclimatize your planks for 48 hours. For example, if you buy your planks on a Sunday, you’ll want to install on Tuesday. Start the acclimation process by laying each box horizontally (flat on their backs) in center of room where they will be installed. For wall applications, laminate flooring must be at least 8mm thick in order to prevent damage to the locking system caused by brad nailer. General... Read More
The ‘Can-I-Install-Laminate-Flooring-Over-This?’ Guide

The ‘Can-I-Install-Laminate-Flooring-Over-This?’ Guide

We’ve listed alphabetically all of the flooring types available so that you can easily determine whether you can install laminate over that specific flooring type. Remember that laminate flooring, like American Concepts, is a floating floor; it will expand and contract as temperature and other conditions change. This means that the choice of subfloor, i.e., what you install laminate over, needs to provide the right support and meets the specifications listed above. Bamboo: Not recommended. Brick: No. Even with a brick floor in excellent condition, there is the potential for too much surface deviance that could stress the laminate-flooring locking system. And if the floor is below grade, moisture migration will be too difficult to control. Carpeting, tufted: No. Carpet, its padding, and all its staples must be completely removed — down to the subfloor — before you install laminate flooring. Carpeting, commercial or needle-bond: No. Some types and styles of commercial or “indoor/outdoor” carpeting may look harmless, but it and any adhesive used to glue it down must be removed before installing a laminate floor. Carpet tiles: No. Everything has to go. Only the subfloor may remain when you install laminate. Ceramic tiles: Yes. Again, provided the surface of the floor is flat and level (per our laminate subfloor specifications) and the condition of the floor is good. The tiles themselves must be smooth. You must use padding. Check for cracked or loose tiles and grout — these could be signs of a poor floor condition caused by settling that could cause problems for your laminate floor. Concrete slab (above grade): Yes. An above-grade concrete floor will most likely... Read More

Safety and Laminate Flooring Near a Fireplace

As we all know, a warm, cozy crackling fire in your fireplace can have a tendency to spark, pop and toss a few hot embers out for the heck of it. That’s why you should always have a fireplace screen in place to protect your home. You should also leave at least two feet between your fireplace and the laminate floor — that’s usually the size of a hearth. But just in case a glowing ember slips through or over the screen, know that if it lands on your Swiss Krono laminate floor, it won’t be a problem. That’s because limited exposure to a flame won’t harm a... Read More
Proper Time and Tools Ensure Installation Success

Proper Time and Tools Ensure Installation Success

Before you begin your Swiss Krono laminate flooring installation project, make sure you’ve got the necessary time and tools to do the job right.Time is an important tool when installing a laminate floor.One of the big advantages of choosing laminate as a floor covering is that it’s relatively easy to install. Compared to many floor-covering options such as ceramic tile, hardwood and even carpet, nothing could be truer.However, many do-it-yourselfers make the mistake of under-estimating the time that they should allow to complete even a small flooring project. We recommend that you set aside three days to avoid any frustration because you’re trying to hurry the process:Day 1: Removal — Move the furniture out of the way and then remove the old floor. Correct any problems or unevenness in the subfloor.Day 2: Installation — Install the laminate flooring.Day 3: Trim and Moldings — Install the trim and moldings, move the furniture back and enjoy.Don’t forget to take the time to acclimate your laminate-flooring planks a minimum of 48 hours before you begin the installation. A Couple of “timely” additions are worth noting… If this is your first laminate-flooring installation, take time to gather the right tools and read the installation instructions of your newly purchased flooring thoroughly. If this is your one-hundredth installation, you should still allow time to read the instructions thoroughly and check the condition of your tools. Remember, instructions can get updated and tend to vary from style to style.Let’s say you’re planning a below-grade installation over a concrete floor. You’ll need to verify the moisture-vapor flow in the concrete by testing and then applying a low VOC... Read More
How to Measure for Laminate Flooring in Three Steps

How to Measure for Laminate Flooring in Three Steps

Determining how much laminate flooring you need to buy is relatively simple, but it pays to measure properly. Follow these basic steps and then take advantage of the Flooring Calculator to make sure you order the right amount.Step 1.Figure out the square footage of each room in which you want to install laminate-wood floors. To do so, use a tape measure to determine the room’s length and width. Then multiply the length by the width to get your square footage. For instance, if the room is 12 feet wide and 12 feet long, you will need enough flooring for 144 square feet (12×12=144).Step 2.Add 10% to the square footage to accommodate cuts and waste. (If you’re choosing a tile pattern, add 20%). This is important because the cuts in the flooring need to be staggered. And you’ll want pieces left over just in case you need to mend or replace a board. So that’s 144 feet plus 10%, or 14 feet, for 158 square feet.Step 3.Check with a retailer to get your order just right; we recommend going through an authorized Swiss Krono Flooring dealer. Your measurements will certainly give you a good ballpark estimate when you multiply your square-foot needs by the retailer’s price per square foot. But little things can make a difference in the actual calculation. For instance, for installation in rooms larger than 40 feet long or 25 feet wide, a transition piece will be required. A professional will help make sure you have all the accessories you’ll need, from transition strips to underlayment to floor molding.Want to learn more about installing laminate flooring? Visit... Read More
Why Expansion Gaps Matter When Installing Floors

Why Expansion Gaps Matter When Installing Floors

When it comes to properly installing Swiss Krono laminate flooring, or any brand of laminate flooring for that matter, maintaining proper expansion gaps around the periphery of the floor is critical to its success. Why are expansion gaps necessary? The core of Swiss Krono laminate flooring is made from high-density fiberboard (HDF). While HDF is extremely strong and durable, like any wood it’s also porous. That means that environmental factors like subtle changes in heat and humidity will cause the planks to expand and contract. Because laminate flooring is a floating floor and should never be nailed or glued down to the subfloor, it must have the ability to expand and contract, unencumbered by such vertical obstructions as walls, doorways or cabinets that can become “pinch-points” for the flooring. Without expansion gaps, you risk performance issues like buckling and squeaking of your laminate floor. Advice About Expansion Gaps from Flooring-Professionals.com On the Flooring-Professionals.com website, you’ll find an informative article, Why Floating Floors Fail. Their excellent diagram (reproduced above) gives you an idea of what an expansion gap is. This article is written by Tim McAdoo, a certified installer. Tim shares his do’s and don’ts when it comes to installing floating floors. It’s well worth your time to check this out. Using spacers to create a uniform expansion gap Spacers play an important role in the installation process and should be part of your installation toolkit. Check out this video, “How to Install a Laminate Floor,” from Lowe’s Home Improvement. Note the placement of the spacers all around the periphery of the floor next to the wall. These spacers maintain... Read More
Acclimating: Why It’s Essential to Wait 48 Hours

Acclimating: Why It’s Essential to Wait 48 Hours

A word of caution: Never install your new laminate floor as soon as the cartons arrive at your home. Any new laminate floor, like American Concepts, needs to sit in your house for at least 48 hours in the room it will be installed in order to acclimate or to become accustomed to a new climate or conditions.For example, if you live in the desert Southwest, where it’s very dry, and decided to take a vacation exploring the rain forest in Brazil, where’s it’s intensely humid, it might take you a few days to get used to – or get acclimated to – your new environment.Your new laminate flooring is no different. Its home environment — where it was made — is likely to be quite different from where it will be installed — your home — in terms of humidity levels and temperature. And there’s also extremes the flooring is exposed to during shipping and storage in a store or warehouse.Therefore, laminate flooring needs a little time to get acclimated. Why does laminate flooring need to be acclimated? All laminate flooring has a fiberboard core. In the case of Swiss Krono and its American Concepts line, it’s a high-density fiberboard (HDF) core.All wood, including HDF, is porous on a microscopic level, even though it may look quite solid. These tiny openings allow air inside the core, carrying with it whatever humidity there may be. The more humid the air, the more likelihood that planks will swell; the less humid the air, the more likelihood the planks will shrink. While this swelling or shrinking may be very slight, it could... Read More
How to Deal With Sunlight When Installing a Floor

How to Deal With Sunlight When Installing a Floor

While sunlight can focus marvelous attention on the beautiful, new laminate floor that you’re about to install, it also may have implications for your floor. Thankfully, we’re not talking about fading. However, there are other implications to be aware of before installing laminate flooring. We all like big beautiful windows. The problem is, they can generate as much heat as they let in light. And the heat generated from sunlight, especially in rooms facing south or west, can create hot spots at certain times of the day. The temperature swing can be as much as 10% in an hour in some cases. Laminate flooring can be affected by heat, causing it to swell when the temperature rises and shrink when it drops. The change is almost imperceptible — we’re talking tiny fractions of an inch. However, multiply that over several planks and, well, it could create a noticeable buckling problem, particularly at what are called “pinch points” or doorways. (Note: A doorway is considered a pinch point particularly if you cannot pass through the door carrying a standard size laminate plank across your shoulders.) Here are tips for dealing with effects of bright sunlight when you install laminate flooring: ● Maintain the maximum expansion gap of 3/8 of an inch around the perimeter of the room. This is the maximum that can covered by a quarter-round molding. ● Have a sufficient expansion gap with your transition molding at your pinch points. ● Your laminate flooring will look its best when it is oriented to be parallel to the longest wall in the... Read More
Tongue or Groove? Which to Install First

Tongue or Groove? Which to Install First

Which side is the tongue, which the groove, and which goes first during installation?The tongue is the side that you will want to place against the wall as you start your laminate-flooring installation. If you mix the two up and start with the groove side, you will have difficulty completing the installation because you will essentially be installing the flooring backwards.In the line drawing above of an Express Clic System plank profile, note the orientation for the tongue and the groove. As this illustration indicates, the tongue for any Swiss Krono click system (Express Clic and Drop-and-Lock, Clic2Clic and Tap-and-Lock, 5G and Angle-to-Angle) protrudes outward, while the groove part forms a cavity for the tongue of the next plank to fit into. Both are cut to micron precision so that they create a snug, interlocking installation.You will want to start in the left side of the wall you pick with the tongue on the long side of a plank facing the wall. The tongue against the wall should be removed. You can use a sharp utility knife for the 7-mm or 8-mm product, but 10-mm or 12-mm product will require a saw.It is important to work from left to right to avoid damaging the tongues on the short side of the boards.Before getting started with your installation project, and after you have acclimated your laminate flooring planks, it’s a good idea to get all of your planks oriented in the same direction with the tongue side of each plank parallel to the wall you will be installing... Read More